THURSDAY, 18 March

Day 4 – Thursday March, 18

}

9:30 – 11:00

ESSA@Work

Kavin Narasimhan, CRESS – University of Surrey, UK
Silvia Leoni, University of Leicester, UK
Natalie Davis, Lancaster University, UK
Dino Carpentras, University of Limerick, Ireland

ESSA@work Fest edition

The session consists of a 3-hour workshop allowing 4~6 participants to present their work in progress individual- or agent-based models (IBMs or ABMs) at any stage of development. Feedback will come from the audience as well as from two expert modellers, who will discuss the work in depth providing presenters with an opportunity to listen to the conversation with no need to “defend” their modelling choices.
During the session, we will first introduce the ESSA@work concept, followed by presentations from participants. We also intend to host an invited talk by an experienced modeller focusing on the topic of “lessons from the process of modelling ABMs”. We hope that the talk will provide an opportunity for audience and participants to learn about the key elements to focus on during the process of developing their ABMs and hear of best practices to transform their ideas into a complete project.

11:00 – 11:15

Break

 

}

11:15 – 12:45

ESSA@Work

Kavin Narasimhan, CRESS – University of Surrey, UK
Silvia Leoni, University of Leicester, UK
Natalie Davis, Lancaster University, UK
Dino Carpentras, University of Limerick, Ireland

ESSA@work Fest edition

The session consists of a 3-hour workshop allowing 4~6 participants to present their work in progress individual- or agent-based models (IBMs or ABMs) at any stage of development. Feedback will come from the audience as well as from two expert modellers, who will discuss the work in depth providing presenters with an opportunity to listen to the conversation with no need to “defend” their modelling choices.
During the session, we will first introduce the ESSA@work concept, followed by presentations from participants. We also intend to host an invited talk by an experienced modeller focusing on the topic of “lessons from the process of modelling ABMs”. We hope that the talk will provide an opportunity for audience and participants to learn about the key elements to focus on during the process of developing their ABMs and hear of best practices to transform their ideas into a complete project.

12:45 – 13:30

Lunch break

 

TRACK ONE

Modeling Values in Agents, Institutions, and Technologies

Amineh Ghorbani, TU Delft, Delft, the Netherlands
Anna Melnyk, TU Delft, Delft, the Netherlands
Bruce Edmonds, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK

}

13:30 – 15:00

Addressing new challenges in socio-technical systems requires a critical inquiry into behaviour-related concepts like values, beliefs, and norms. We will have a workshop on “Modelling Values in Agents, Technologies and Institutions” which goal is to bring together international researchers that are experimenting with qualitative concepts (e.g., values, norms, beliefs) in their agent-based models. This workshop facilitates new cross-disciplinary ABM research pathways by learning from each other’s experiences and challenges of implementing quantitative concepts like values in the modelling practice. As a concept in ABM practice, value only recently started to get deserved attention despite playing a core role in a decision making process that informs agents’ actions. Complex socio-technical challenges of the energy transition, climate change, and, in particular, the disruptive COVID-19 pandemic triggered a series of ABM research that adopts the concept of value from different domains like ethics, psychology, and anthropology. Insights into values are particularly essential when researching new technologies and policies impacts and the agent’s responses to the implementation of these. The 3-hour workshop will explore such concepts to understand better agents’ behaviours regarding technologies and institutions and a potential impact on the model’s robustness, illustrative, explanatory, and predictive power.

TRACK TWO

Applied macroeconomic analysis and modelling in complex systems

Juan Gabriel Brida, Universidad de la República, Uruguay
Silvia London, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Argentina
Emiliano Alvarez, Universidad de la República, Uruguay

}

13:30 – 15:00

During the last half century, in conjunction with the increased availability of data and the improvement in statistical and econometric techniques, macroeconomics has increased its emphasis on empirical analysis and modelling. The application of concepts and techniques of complex systems to economics implies that many of the characteristics of these systems (self-organization, non-linearity, emergence, interdependence, adaptation, irreversibility) need a different analytical tool to be analyzed. Advances in the analysis of social networks, study of aggregate distribution functions (and the study of the occurrence of power laws), use of tools to study long memory processes in economics and sensitivity analysis generated from simulations of Agent-based models are part of the tools to study these processes. In this seminar, different studies that seek to analyze macroeconomic problems (inflation, unemployment, economic growth, inequality) will be presented under the paradigm of complexity.

15:00 – 15:15

Break

 

TRACK ONE

Modeling Values in Agents, Institutions, and Technologies

Amineh Ghorbani, TU Delft, Delft, the Netherlands
Anna Melnyk, TU Delft, Delft, the Netherlands
Bruce Edmonds, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK

}

15:15 – 16:45

Addressing new challenges in socio-technical systems requires a critical inquiry into behaviour-related concepts like values, beliefs, and norms. We will have a workshop on “Modelling Values in Agents, Technologies and Institutions” which goal is to bring together international researchers that are experimenting with qualitative concepts (e.g., values, norms, beliefs) in their agent-based models. This workshop facilitates new cross-disciplinary ABM research pathways by learning from each other’s experiences and challenges of implementing quantitative concepts like values in the modelling practice. As a concept in ABM practice, value only recently started to get deserved attention despite playing a core role in a decision making process that informs agents’ actions. Complex socio-technical challenges of the energy transition, climate change, and, in particular, the disruptive COVID-19 pandemic triggered a series of ABM research that adopts the concept of value from different domains like ethics, psychology, and anthropology. Insights into values are particularly essential when researching new technologies and policies impacts and the agent’s responses to the implementation of these. The 3-hour workshop will explore such concepts to understand better agents’ behaviours regarding technologies and institutions and a potential impact on the model’s robustness, illustrative, explanatory, and predictive power.

TRACK TWO

Applied macroeconomic analysis and modelling in complex systems

Juan Gabriel Brida, Universidad de la República, Uruguay
Silvia London, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Argentina
Emiliano Alvarez, Universidad de la República, Uruguay

}

15:15 – 16:45

During the last half century, in conjunction with the increased availability of data and the improvement in statistical and econometric techniques, macroeconomics has increased its emphasis on empirical analysis and modelling. The application of concepts and techniques of complex systems to economics implies that many of the characteristics of these systems (self-organization, non-linearity, emergence, interdependence, adaptation, irreversibility) need a different analytical tool to be analyzed. Advances in the analysis of social networks, study of aggregate distribution functions (and the study of the occurrence of power laws), use of tools to study long memory processes in economics and sensitivity analysis generated from simulations of Agent-based models are part of the tools to study these processes. In this seminar, different studies that seek to analyze macroeconomic problems (inflation, unemployment, economic growth, inequality) will be presented under the paradigm of complexity.